Devin Caughey

Devin Caughey

Associate Professor of Political Science

CV

American political development; Southern politics; representation; political parties; Congress; state politics; latent-variable models; survey weighting; regression-discontinuity designs; permutation inference.

Biography

Devin Caughey is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT. Caughey earned his PhD at Berkeley under the supervision of Eric Schickler. He previously studied history at Yale and Cambridge. Devin Caughey is primarily interested in the fields of American Politics and American Political Development, with a side interest in Political Methodology. His current book project, "Representation without Parties: Reconsidering the One-Party South," examines the ideological evolution and diversity of Southern members of Congress and their relationship to public opinion in the region. Caughey's work has appeared in the journals Studies in American Political Development and Political Analysis, which in 2012 named his "Elections and the Regression Discontinuity Design" (with Jasjeet Sekhon) an Editor's Choice Article for its contribution to political methodology. The article was also awarded the 2012 Warren Miller Prize by the Society for Political Methodology.

Research

Projects

“Elections and the Regression-Discontinuity Design: Lessons from Close U.S. House Races, 1942–2008”

“Public Opinion, Organized Labor, and the Limits of New Deal Liberalism, 1936–1945”

“Honor and War: Using Southern Presidents to Identify Reputational Effects in International Conflict”

“Defining, Mapping, and Measuring Bureaucratic Autonomy”

Dissertation

Congress, Public Opinion, and Representation in the One-Party South, 1930s–1960s

Recent Publications

"Elections and the Regression Discontinuity Design: Lessons from Close U.S. House Races, 1942–2008." Political Analysis 19(4): 385–408. 2011. (with Jasjeet S. Sekhon).

"Public Opinion, Organized Labor, and the Limits of New Deal Liberalism, 1936–1945." Studies in American Political Development 25(2): 162–189. 2011. (with Eric Schickler).

Teaching

17.263/4 Electoral Politics

News

Giving the people what they want?

Peter Dizikes MIT News

Research by MIT political scientist Devin Caughey shows that over time, elected politicians in the U.S. are generally responsive to the opinions of voters.

What must the US do to sustain its democracy?

Peter Dizikes MIT News

Recent months have been tumultuous for U.S. democracy, in ways that are both novel and yet also connected to conflicts seen throughout the country’s past. MIT News spoke to several of the Institute’s political scientists and historians, and asked them: What must the U.S. do to sustain the health of its democracy?

Devin Caughey receives the Leon Epstein Award

MIT Department of Political Science

We are pleased to announce that Silverman (1968) Family Career Development Associate Professor Devin Caughey's book, The Unsolid South, has been awarded the Leon Epstein Outstanding Book Award by the Political Organizations and Parties Section of APSA.

People Power

Peter Dizikes MIT News

In politics, your voices make a difference. At least at the state level of U.S. politics, that is. A new study co-authored by an MIT political scientist shows that state policies in the U.S. from 1936 through 2014 have been responsive to public opinion — and have become even more aligned with it in recent decades.

Mapping the history of U.S. state politics

Peter Dizikes MIT News

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, in a 1932 opinion, wrote that a state could be a “laboratory” for policy, and “try novel social and economic experiments” on its own. We have since turned those words into today’s common political phrase that the 50 U.S. states are “laboratories of democracy.”

Biography

Devin Caughey is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT. Caughey earned his PhD at Berkeley under the supervision of Eric Schickler. He previously studied history at Yale and Cambridge. Devin Caughey is primarily interested in the fields of American Politics and American Political Development, with a side interest in Political Methodology. His current book project, "Representation without Parties: Reconsidering the One-Party South," examines the ideological evolution and diversity of Southern members of Congress and their relationship to public opinion in the region. Caughey's work has appeared in the journals Studies in American Political Development and Political Analysis, which in 2012 named his "Elections and the Regression Discontinuity Design" (with Jasjeet Sekhon) an Editor's Choice Article for its contribution to political methodology. The article was also awarded the 2012 Warren Miller Prize by the Society for Political Methodology.

Research

Projects

“Elections and the Regression-Discontinuity Design: Lessons from Close U.S. House Races, 1942–2008”

“Public Opinion, Organized Labor, and the Limits of New Deal Liberalism, 1936–1945”

“Honor and War: Using Southern Presidents to Identify Reputational Effects in International Conflict”

“Defining, Mapping, and Measuring Bureaucratic Autonomy”

Dissertation

Congress, Public Opinion, and Representation in the One-Party South, 1930s–1960s

Recent Publications

"Elections and the Regression Discontinuity Design: Lessons from Close U.S. House Races, 1942–2008." Political Analysis 19(4): 385–408. 2011. (with Jasjeet S. Sekhon).

"Public Opinion, Organized Labor, and the Limits of New Deal Liberalism, 1936–1945." Studies in American Political Development 25(2): 162–189. 2011. (with Eric Schickler).

Teaching

17.263/4 Electoral Politics

News

Giving the people what they want?

Peter Dizikes MIT News

Research by MIT political scientist Devin Caughey shows that over time, elected politicians in the U.S. are generally responsive to the opinions of voters.

What must the US do to sustain its democracy?

Peter Dizikes MIT News

Recent months have been tumultuous for U.S. democracy, in ways that are both novel and yet also connected to conflicts seen throughout the country’s past. MIT News spoke to several of the Institute’s political scientists and historians, and asked them: What must the U.S. do to sustain the health of its democracy?

Devin Caughey receives the Leon Epstein Award

MIT Department of Political Science

We are pleased to announce that Silverman (1968) Family Career Development Associate Professor Devin Caughey's book, The Unsolid South, has been awarded the Leon Epstein Outstanding Book Award by the Political Organizations and Parties Section of APSA.

People Power

Peter Dizikes MIT News

In politics, your voices make a difference. At least at the state level of U.S. politics, that is. A new study co-authored by an MIT political scientist shows that state policies in the U.S. from 1936 through 2014 have been responsive to public opinion — and have become even more aligned with it in recent decades.

Mapping the history of U.S. state politics

Peter Dizikes MIT News

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, in a 1932 opinion, wrote that a state could be a “laboratory” for policy, and “try novel social and economic experiments” on its own. We have since turned those words into today’s common political phrase that the 50 U.S. states are “laboratories of democracy.”